Archive for Communication

How To Think? Use Visible Thinking to Help Your Child Master the Art of Thinking

“Think from different perspectives.” Sounds all too familiar? This is a phrase we keep repeating to ourselves, to our friends as well as to our children. But, how can we make someone think? Have you ever wished you were able to impart your thinking process to someone else? But, thinking is not visible, it happens inside our brain. How do you cultivate visible thinking?

Is it possible to make thinking visible? How can we make it visible to our kids, just like teaching them writing or dancing? There are many ways to encourage visible thinking in children.

Visible Thinking is part of the Project Zero program of Harvard University. Educators practicing Visible Thinking make use of many thinking routines to enhance the thinking horizon of their students. Here are five strategies you can use in strengthening your child’s thinking habits.

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1. Use the language of thinking

Visible Thinking Singapore

Many children have the habit of saying “I don’t know” when they are unable to express their ideas or think in a coherent manner. One powerful way for you to help your child in expressing their ideas is by using the language of thinking. “What makes you think so?”, “What is another way to do this?”, “What else?”, “Why does the other group think so?” Questions like these make your child think about their thinking patterns.

2. Circle of viewpoints

Visible Thinking Singapore

This activity encourages diversity of viewpoints. Often in groups, children (as well as adults) tend to get influenced by other people’s ideas and viewpoints. Encourage your child to pick up a particular point of view from available choices and talk about it. For example, if you are talking about pollution, they may pick up the viewpoint of the factory owner, the factory worker, the people suffering from the pollution, an environmentalist, an economist and so on. Use this activity to boost your child’s confidence in expressing their viewpoints, when those are different from other people’s.

You can do circle of viewpoints as a family activity. Take up everyday situations or funny scenarios as a starting point.

3. Questioning

Visible Thinking Singapore

Ask your child to make as many questions as they can after they read a storybook or an academic book. The questions could also be related to a movie they watched or a game they played. It is the questions that lead to answers. Focus on the questions first, irrespective of whether they know the answers or not.

4. Get in touch with past experiences and knowledge

Visible Thinking Singapore

“What does it remind you of?” Use this powerful question in various situations and experiences. While helping in relating to their previous knowledge, this activity also helps in connecting with their emotions. The way they answer to this question does not have to be verbal all the time. Help them to express it in terms of words, pictures, music or movements depending on what their style is or the current mood they are in.

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5. Storytelling without words

Visible Thinking Singapore

“How can you say stories without words?”, “What are the options?”, “It is impossible”. Be ready to hear these responses when you introduce this strategy. However, when your child realises you really mean what you said, they would start thinking. Now, their responses would be different. They may ask you questions like “Can I use puppets?”, “Can I use pictures or crafts?”, “Can I act it out?” This is a great strategy to make your child explore ideas on how they can express those stories in a manner another person can enjoy it, without the help of words.

Making thinking visible helps your child in cultivating good thinking habits and in expressing their thoughts clearly. Further more, it gives the confidence to play around with alternative plans and solutions.

For our workshops on thinking skills, please visit Thinkers Unlimited.

Share this article with your friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

Public Speaking Camp designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Junior Champs Leadership Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Junior Champs Leadership Camp designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking Camp

Design Thinking Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Growth Mindset Camp

Growth Mindset Workshop Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Junior Public Speaking & Confidence Building Workshop designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication.

NEW POSTER 6 copy

About Sindu Sreebhavan

Sindu Sreebhavan is the founder of As Many Minds Minds Pte Ltd and the chief editor of The Kidz Parade Edutainment magazine, Asia's premium publication for cultivating creativity and creative writing in children. Sindu is also the founder of International Youth Leadership and Innovation Forum (IYLIF). With a passion to infuse innovation in education and inject innovative mindset in people, Sindu writes, speaks and consults on innovation and creativity in business and education. She says innovation does not start with invention, it starts with a mindset. “The best gift you can give a child is the power of Confidence, Creativity and Communication” is her tagline. She is passionate about educating educators, parents and children about youth development, youth leadership, education innovation and 21st century education. She supports children, parents, schools and several organisations in these areas.

How To Boost Academics By Growing Growth Mindset

Many parents worry why their child is not able to achieve their true potential. Most parents, especially in Singapore, turn into enrolling children in multiple tuition classes to enhance their academics. While extra academic aid helps to a certain extend, it is essential to focus on a very important aspect – the growth mindset of the child.

The education system in Singapore is highly acclaimed all over the world. It’s academic value has been proven by many international scoring systems. However, is it making children future ready? In order to find that out, let us take a look at what the future demands from the children.

  1. The future is anticipating people who are competent in springing up new ideas, capable of communicating those ideas with confidence and keen in collaborating with others to implement those ideas.
  2. The future is anticipating people who would be able to contribute effectively where AI won’t be able to contribute well.
  3. The future is anticipating people who have perfected the art of learning and unlearning.

Why is growth mindset important in the era of gig economy?

The rise of gig economy where we see people work on short term assignments will demand quick adaptation to changes a necessity. This will also expect people to learn much quickly than the current pace. In order to cope with all these requirements of the future, we need to encourage growth mindset in children. This not only will help them in the future, this will also make them work effectively under the academic pressure they are facing now.

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What is growth mindset?

Growth mindset is a term coined by the famous Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck. She studied the behaviour of thousands of children and argued that it is not just the abilities and the talent that guide children towards the path of success. She divides the mindset into two – Fixed Mindset and Growth Mindset.

A person with “fixed mindset” believes that we are born with certain amount of intelligence, talent and creativity and that do not change during our lifetime. A person with fixed mindset relates their successes and failures as the proof of their talent and intelligence. They would try to avoid situations and challenges where they fear they would fail. On the otherhand, a person with growth mindset does not relate successes and failures to their intelligence. They see success as a result of the efforts they put in and the challenges they overcame and the failures as opportunities for learning and improvement. This difference in thinking lead people with growth mindset to take up challenges and opportunities with confidence and always strive to give their best in every situation.

With a growth mindset, children could achieve higher grades, work towards achieving their targets and learn from their experiences and failures.

How does Growth mindset help?

In the past, scientists thought our brain stops growing as soon we cross our twenties. It was believed that our intelligence and talent were fixed at birth. Research in the last few decades, has shown that human brain never stops growing. It keeps learning and gets smarter depending on what it is exposed to. So, the intelligence and talent can go up or down. A growth mindset gives the attitude to children to take on challenges and to work towards their goals. The more they use their intelligence and skills, the more their intelligence and skills grow.

Growth mindset sets children (as well as adults) on a journey of continuous learning, self-improvement and committed work towards their goals.

How can you develop growth mindset in your child?

There are many areas you can focus on while adopting a growth mindset for your family or students.

1. Praise them for the effort

When you tell a child that “you are intelligent”, you are not at all helping that child. Instead, you are creating a fixed mindset in the child. It is not the praising that helps a child, it is how you praise that helps a child.

When you praise a child for their achievement, you can do it in two ways:

  • You can praise to push them down into a fixed mindset or
  • you can praise to raise them into the growth mindset.

When you praise the child for the results, you are limiting their potential by cementing the fixed mindset. But when you praise them for the efforts, you are expanding their horizon to grow the growth mindset. When you praise them, praise them for the behaviour that they followed in achieving what they have achieved. This will help to ascertain that the efforts and the behaviour they practiced in this situation could be consistently used in other situations as well.

When your child gets an ‘A’ in their test, you praise them for their effort in achieving that, not for achieving an ‘A’. Did they put a lot of efforts into it? Did they show the initiative to gather sufficient information about that topic from various sources and people? Did they come up with some new study plans recently? Tell them what are some of their efforts that led them to achieve what they achieved. Is it applicable only when they achieve an ‘A’? – Definitely not. It is applicable in every situation. If they did not get the results you expected, it does not mean that they did everything wrong, there should be something right that they did in spite of the not so favourable results.

2. Embrace Challenges

Carole Dweck’s research saw 90% of students showing interest in embarking on a challenging new task with a learning opportunity, when they were praised for their efforts. Whereas, when they were praised for their intelligence and/or their talent they were reluctant to try challenging tasks. This is because they were scared that if they fail, it will be reflected negatively on their image of being intelligent or talented.

On the other hand, a growth mindset gives children the attitude to work for what they want to achieve overcoming the challenges on the way.

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3. Learn from failures

Something went wrong? It is natural to feel bad about it. But, is there anything else we can do? In spite of the failure, see what are certain things that went well, certain efforts they did right. What are certain lessons they learned? How can they use this mistake to make their future pursuits better?

In the infographic here, you can see how a child with growth mindset would approach various situations. Are you ready to guide your child to adopt that mindset?

There is a need of deeper understanding among the educators to practice growth mindset inside and outside their classrooms through their actions and communication. We can’t expect children to pick up a growth mindset simply by telling them what growth mindset is. Growth mindset involves a lot of motivating and right communication. Teachers, parents and caretakers need to demonstrate a growth mindset when they deal with children. It takes the whole community to make a mindset change. Let us start it right at our homes and classrooms.

Would you like to hang the above poster on growth mindset in the classroom or in your child’s room? You can download a high resolution copy of the infographics here.

Check out  our workshops on growth mindset here.

You can find more on how to encourage your child to study here.

Share this article with your friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

Public Speaking Camp designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Junior Champs Leadership Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Junior Champs Leadership Camp designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking Camp

Design Thinking Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Growth Mindset Camp

Growth Mindset Workshop Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Junior Public Speaking & Confidence Building Workshop designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication.

NEW POSTER 6 copy

 

About Sindu Sreebhavan

Sindu Sreebhavan is the founder of As Many Minds Minds Pte Ltd and the chief editor of The Kidz Parade Edutainment magazine, Asia's premium publication for cultivating creativity and creative writing in children. Sindu is also the founder of International Youth Leadership and Innovation Forum (IYLIF). With a passion to infuse innovation in education and inject innovative mindset in people, Sindu writes, speaks and consults on innovation and creativity in business and education. She says innovation does not start with invention, it starts with a mindset. “The best gift you can give a child is the power of Confidence, Creativity and Communication” is her tagline. She is passionate about educating educators, parents and children about youth development, youth leadership, education innovation and 21st century education. She supports children, parents, schools and several organisations in these areas.

How to Raise Successful Kids: Design Thinking Way

In every dialogue I have with parents about their concerns, there is one topic they always passionately speak about – The kind of education they wish to provide for their children. There is also a tail end of that wish where they say, “I know it is just a dream”.

Many of them think it is impossible to provide a holistic education experience where children will be empowered to express their ideas and apply their skills, while developing their factual understanding.

Design Thinking for children Singapore

Design thinking is a structured process that provides an empowering and enriching learning space. According to Stanford University D.School, design thinking process consists of five steps: empathize, define, ideate, prototype and test. The beauty of the methodology is that you can use it everywhere, be it in a classroom, at home or in an office. Apple, PepsiCo and Airbnb are just some of the companies that found success with it.

Before you jump into any conclusion that it is all for high-tech firms and big companies, let me assure it is not just for them. It is a methodology you can use anywhere as long as you have a problem to solve. There are schools around the world that have used Design Thinking to cultivate problem solving skills and innovation in students.

Teaching children using the design thinking methodology invokes a few mindset changes in their overall learning journey.

1. Teaches children to be more innovative and creative

Children learn how to take a problem from stating the problem, tossing ideas to solve it, all the way to implementing it. Prototyping of the solutions in the design thinking process provides the users of the solutions to get a first hand idea of how it is going to look and behave. This enhances their initiative and entrepreneurial skills. As Indra Nooyi, the CEO of PepsiCo said, “Design leads to innovation and innovation demands design”.

2. Empowers children to be more confident in expressing their ideas

Design Thinking relies a lot on prompting everyone in the group to express their ideas about the topics they handle. Ideation and brainstorming phases of design thinking is communication rich. While imparting valuable life skills such as brainstorming to a child, a design rich environment also boosts children’s confidence in their ideas and imagination. It helps them to come out of their shells and express themselves.

3. Empowers Children to work towards achieving their own goals

Design thinking process is an end-to-end process. Children come up with question statements, solution ideas and prototypes. This is an iterative process and they improve the ideas in each iteration after getting feedback from the users. Once both parties are satisfied with the solution, they implement it or pass it over to the people who are responsible to implement it. This self-driven approach enables them to take on future challenges as leaders, innovators and creative thinkers.

4. Teaches teamwork to children

In a Design Thinking environment, children learn teamwork by working collaboratively. This is a non-judgemental environment where no ideas are shut down. Whereas, a traditional classroom gives more focus to individual efforts and the system is highly competitive. In that system children are offered team-building programs to learn teamwork over hypothetical situations once or twice a year. Does it leave any long-standing effect in the child?

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5. Boosts problem solving skills in children by cultivating different thinking styles

Children learn to look at all aspects of a problem while trying to solve it. It uses both Divergent thinking and convergent thinking styles. In divergent thinking, they generate as many ideas as they can without any constraints. In Convergent thinking, they delve deep into selected ideas and apply the un-moveable constraints into it. The main agenda of design thinking is problem solving. This problem solving is undoubtedly multi-disciplinary. It helps children to connect everything they learn to solve the problem they are facing. And it helps them in every discipline they are learning and every situation they are exposed to.

6. Helps children to grow up as socially responsible citizens

Since Design Thinking programs focus on solving real life challenges, children feel what they are doing is relevant to the community and the world around them. It gives them the tools and the confidence to make the change. They grow up with an understanding of the world around them.

7. Teaches children how to think from other people’s perspectives

Design thinking is human-centered and empathy is instilled in it. Children are continuously encouraged to think about the feelings of the users of their solutions. It tries to integrate the needs of people, technology and the criteria of learning when used right.

 

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8. Encourages children to listen and respect other people’s ideas

One important virtue that children will get rewarded with is the listening skills. It helps children to combine creative thinking and analytical thinking.

9. Inspires children to be more curious and inquisitive

It creates an enquiry culture in the school. When children are faced with a challenge, they will first get in to ‘Why is it happening’ mode instead of jumping into ‘Let me solve it’ mode. This ‘Why culture’ helps not only in their student life and later in their professional life, it also helps them in solving their personal problems. Children become more experienced in applying their knowledge and seeking new knowledge.

10. Teaches children to look at failures as learning experiences

Since they play around with multiple ideas for the same problem, children come to realize that if one does not work, they will be able to find another solution. It changes the concept of failure in their mind. They learn to look at every disappoint as a learning experience.

In a study by IBM in 2012, 1700 CEOs from 64 countries voted collaboration, communication and creativity as the top three traits that are critical for an employee’s success. As per a NACE survey among 160 employers, problem solving is among the top four skills employers seek in a candidate. Incidentally, Design Thinking comes with all these offerings on a silver plate. Shouldn’t our education systems take advantage of that?

Check out our workshops on Design Thinking here and here.

Share this article with your friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

Public Speaking Camp designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Junior Champs Leadership Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Junior Champs Leadership Camp designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking Camp

Design Thinking Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Growth Mindset Camp

Growth Mindset Workshop Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Junior Public Speaking & Confidence Building Workshop designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication.

NEW POSTER 6 copy

About Sindu Sreebhavan

Sindu Sreebhavan is the founder of As Many Minds Minds Pte Ltd and the chief editor of The Kidz Parade Edutainment magazine, Asia's premium publication for cultivating creativity and creative writing in children. Sindu is also the founder of International Youth Leadership and Innovation Forum (IYLIF). With a passion to infuse innovation in education and inject innovative mindset in people, Sindu writes, speaks and consults on innovation and creativity in business and education. She says innovation does not start with invention, it starts with a mindset. “The best gift you can give a child is the power of Confidence, Creativity and Communication” is her tagline. She is passionate about educating educators, parents and children about youth development, youth leadership, education innovation and 21st century education. She supports children, parents, schools and several organisations in these areas.

Future-ready child: 3 effective ways to achieve it with questions

“How do I make my future-ready?” This is an oft repeated question. Being future-ready is not an all-in-one package deal. Being future-ready in today’s climate is the ability to unlearn and learn. In this article I would like to talk about one of the important aspects of unlearning and learning – asking questions.

What is the best thing you could do with a question? Of course, it is to ask. Asking questions helps children to learn and have come to their own conclusions. However, many children refrain from asking questions. Have you ever wondered how you could help your child with it? To cultivate effective inquiry skills in your child, it is important to create a question-asking environment at home. Questions are the secret bullet that make your child future-ready. It is this environment that they are going to wear and carry around when they go out into the world.

A recent survey by World Economic Forum lists Critical Thinking as one of the top two skills required to thrive in the new world order. Experts are of the opinion that asking questions is what sparks curiosity and critical thinking in children. Questions drive thinking, enquiry and action. The strategies below will help you to create an inquiry-confident mindset for your child.

1. Ask your child about their questioning ventures of the day

public speaking for children singapore

According to Nobel laureate physicist Isidor I. Rabi, it is one question that shaped his life. He credits his curiosity to his mother’s question, “What did you ask in the class today?”

What do you ask your child when they come back from school? Do you ask them “How was your day?” or “What did you learn?” If you change your question a little bit to enquire about what did they ask, you will gradually observe a different effect in them. This will help them to understand we are all enquirers first and then learners. Isn’t that an effective step to be future-ready?

2. Help to manage the anxiety of looking stupid in front of others

public speaking for children Singapore

Is your child scared that their questions would not make sense? Does your child feel that their peers or teachers would ridicule them for asking? It is time to inject some confidence into your child. While you are doing that, take time for some introspection as well. Are you being kind when you answer to your child’s questions? When your child asks a seemingly stupid question, take time to discuss that topic and help your child to frame a better question. The future is for people who can do out of the box thinking. Out of the box thinking comes from asking such questions. Tell your child that being future-ready means developing the courage to ask such questions.

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3. Promote communication skills in your child

public speaking for children Singapore

Many children (and adults) refrain from asking questions, not because they don’t have anything to ask or they are shy. It is because they are not sure how to frame their questions so that it will sound valid. Helping your child to practice good communication skills will help tremendously in this area.

When you ask questions to your child, be sure to ask ‘Why’ or ‘How’ questions instead of a question that gives you an ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ answer. Be flexible to listen and respond to contradicting ideas.

One thing that is certain is that the future of mankind is only going to be more confusing. Knowing how to question the right way is their passport to take on the challenges of the uncertain world ahead of them. Equip your child with the necessary question-asking skills to be future-ready.

You may find our workshops on thinking skills and creative confidence here.

Share this article with your friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

Public Speaking Camp designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Junior Champs Leadership Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Junior Champs Leadership Camp designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking Camp

Design Thinking Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Growth Mindset Camp

Growth Mindset Workshop Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Junior Public Speaking & Confidence Building Workshop designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication.

NEW POSTER 6 copy

About Sindu Sreebhavan

Sindu Sreebhavan is the founder of As Many Minds Minds Pte Ltd and the chief editor of The Kidz Parade Edutainment magazine, Asia's premium publication for cultivating creativity and creative writing in children. Sindu is also the founder of International Youth Leadership and Innovation Forum (IYLIF). With a passion to infuse innovation in education and inject innovative mindset in people, Sindu writes, speaks and consults on innovation and creativity in business and education. She says innovation does not start with invention, it starts with a mindset. “The best gift you can give a child is the power of Confidence, Creativity and Communication” is her tagline. She is passionate about educating educators, parents and children about youth development, youth leadership, education innovation and 21st century education. She supports children, parents, schools and several organisations in these areas.

The One Thing That Provides A Brighter Future For Your Child

What do employers look for when they select people into their teams? In the 1960’s NASA was in the midst of finding the best people for various teams. The director of NASA wanted to find a way to assign the best people in his teams. He was looking for a way to find people with the best creative ideas for teams that handle difficult problems. He approached George Land, the expert researcher in creative performance for a solution. George Land formed a test to measure the creativity of NASA engineers and scientists.

The test worked impressively well at NASA. The test takers were supposed to derive new, diverse and innovative ideas to solve a given problem. George Land realised that it was a test that could be solved by anyone. So, he decided to give it to children. In 1968, he tried out the same test with 1,600 five year old children. He re-tested the same children when they reached the age of 10 years and later at 15 years. He tried out the same test with over one million adults as a follow up.

The percentage of people who scored at genius level differed among different age groups. 98% of those 5 year olds scored at genius level. However, as they grew older, their creativity and hence their score dropped rapidly at unimaginable levels.

creative problem solving singapore

What makes the thinking skills of children drop as they grow older?

The main reason for this rapid drop in imagination is the way we train our minds. There are two types of thinking: Convergent thinking and Divergent thinking.

  • Divergent thinking focuses on coming up with new ideas without limiting the scope of the thinking horizon, without being judged .
  • Convergent thinking limits the scope of thinking and often looks out for the well defined perfect answer for a problem.

At our schools, children are taught to produce the perfect answer for a problem. This limits their divergent thinking and problem solving skills.

But does it help? As per the IBM 2012 CEO study, which is based on inputs from 1700 CEOs from 64 countries, creativity is among the three traits that are critical for an employee’s success. As per a NACE survey among 160 employers, problem solving is among the top 4 skills employers are seek on a candidate.

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These results bring up the key question: What is more important to you as a parent?– to bring up a child who scores well in their exams or to bring up a child who is capable enough to handle and solve problems in their professional and personal lives. Apparently it is the second type of children that future workforce would prefer to hold closer.

How you can help your child to maximise their thinking potential?

Allow opportunities for your child to grow their creative potential. If you want to be a parent of a child who retain their ability to be creative, encourage them to come up with ideas, allow them to express those ideas without judgment and provide them with opportunities to try out their ideas. This will not only ensure them a brighter future, they will also learn to be self-assured people.

You  can find practical tips on how to encourage your child’s creative potential at

3 Tips to Boost Your Childs Creative Problem Solving Skills

The one thing must do to cultivate Critical Thinking in your child

Engage the Curious Minds

Please visit our workshops on thinking skills here.

Share this article with your friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

Public Speaking Camp designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Junior Champs Leadership Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Junior Champs Leadership Camp designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

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Design Thinking Singapore

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You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Junior Public Speaking & Confidence Building Workshop designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

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You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication.

NEW POSTER 6 copy

About Sindu Sreebhavan

Sindu Sreebhavan is the founder of As Many Minds Minds Pte Ltd and the chief editor of The Kidz Parade Edutainment magazine, Asia's premium publication for cultivating creativity and creative writing in children. Sindu is also the founder of International Youth Leadership and Innovation Forum (IYLIF). With a passion to infuse innovation in education and inject innovative mindset in people, Sindu writes, speaks and consults on innovation and creativity in business and education. She says innovation does not start with invention, it starts with a mindset. “The best gift you can give a child is the power of Confidence, Creativity and Communication” is her tagline. She is passionate about educating educators, parents and children about youth development, youth leadership, education innovation and 21st century education. She supports children, parents, schools and several organisations in these areas.

How Learning Programming Boosts Your Child’s Critical Thinking Skills

These days, programming forms an integral part of all aspects of our lives, from education to social media, banking and information. As Singapore works towards becoming a “smart nation”, the Ministry of Communications and Information has announced that an additional 30,000 ICT jobs need to be filled by 2020. While not every child wants a career as a programmer, learning programming is a valuable life skill for everyone. We have the experts Mr Deddy Setiadi and Mr Himmy Cheng, the co-founders of Tink Tank, talking to us about the benefits of learning programming. Tink tank is a local coding institution that aims to equip every child with programming knowledge and the power to create change. So, why should you get your kids started on their coding journeys now?

1. Programming build up problem solving and computational thinking skills

Learning programming workshop Singapore

Coding is very sequential – you need to know what to write and why one code comes after another. Students will be able to make logical connections that can help them learn to analyse different situations and look at the big picture before drilling down to the smaller steps to reach the goal.  Whenever they do hands on coding activities and face errors, students will learn to identify the problem and debug the programme. Mr Deddy says, “When children learn to code, they are also learning to think. These days, Facebook, handphones and programmable toys are embedded in children’s lives. They should also learn to understand the logic behind these technologies and move beyond being passive consumers to creators of technology.”

“I found the workshop very educational and interesting as it taught us about technology, computer programming and how to use our ideas in building up our own games!” – 10-year-old Saamiya Khan, who has benefitted from Tink Tank‘s workshop and regular classes.

2. Programming empowers children with confidence and creativity 

Learning programming workshop Singapore

Learning with the right tools is essential to creating a strong programming foundation. There are many excellent tools available in the market, such as Scratch, which is developed by MIT and can be used to create computer games and animated stories, to robotics tools like Dot & Dash and mBot. Mr. Himmy lights up when he recalls how his students felt so accomplished when they were able to see the games that they had brainstormed and planned on paper materialised as online games with the instructors’ guidance using Scratch. Mr. Himmy says, “That is why the students are constantly encouraged to express their creativity and challenge boundaries at Tink Tank,” For instance, a perennial kids favourite is the fruit piano segment where they code a virtual piano and play on the fruits by connecting it to Makey Makey, a tool that allows for indirect control of the keyboard. Now, who says a piano must be black and white?

“If your child has even a slight interest in computer, gaming, technology – Tink Tank’s program will open up a fun new world of coding through a series of games and using kid-friendly coding platform, like Scratch. The small class size is a plus, and compared to workshops my 8-year-old had done in the past, the instructors are stellar. My son is already looking forward to the next Tink Tank class!” – Parent of 8-year-old Cai Penn

3. Programming is fun and it develops important life skills

Learning programming workshop Singapore

Though coding may seem very technical and possibly daunting, it is a myth that the skills gained are confined to the realms of the computer lab. Participants of Tink Tank’s programs are also developing important life skills, such as presentation skills, as they are encouraged to actively ask and answer questions in class, and will get the opportunity to present their final creations to their parents. Also, students are put through collaborative exercises that gives them the opportunity to work together, solve problems and learn from each other. To Mr Deddy and Mr Himmy, the growth of the students is more important than school size itself. They promise a 1:4 teacher-student ratio to ensure an intimate, hands-on learning experience, compared to the 1:8 ratio in the market currently. “We get really excited when we see our students grow, and we regularly communicate the student’s individual progress to parents. We want to go the extra mile for our students, “they concluded.

“The Tink Tank workshop has been an extremely engaging program for my daughter. The staff have made the “lesson” super interesting and more importantly, making learning fun! Kudos to the team!” – Parent of 12 year old Ivory.

Just as how Maths and Science shape our world now, our children’s world will be shaped by computers and connected devices. Computer programming has been increasingly incorporated into the Singapore education system, with a new O-level subject called computing introduced this year. As kids have an easier time picking up skills than adults, it’s important to get them started on their coding journey early. If your children have not learnt how to program, now’s the time to start.

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5 Questions to Boost Problem Solving Skills in Your Child

Your child is doing the school homework and says, “I don’t understand this.” How do you respond to this? Your response has far reaching effects on the problem solving skills and learning attitude of your child.

What do you do when your child says “I don’t understand this”? Do you immediately help your child? Do you feel it is your responsibility to teach your child with all the details? It may help your child’s curiosity short-term or save your time short-term. However, you are wasting a golden opportunity to enrich your child with critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Next time when your child says “I don’t understand this”, resist your urge to give the details and guide your child to solve the problem. Asking the right questions will help your child to build their curiosity and critical thinking skills. When they solve the problem by themselves following your careful guidance, they feel more confident. They will be more open to trying out more challenging problems in the future. These are some questions you can ask your child for a guided problem solving process:

Question #1: “What problem are you trying to solve?”

Problem solving skills in children

Image courtesy of potowizard at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

May be your child has not understood the question well. It is the questions that lead to more questions, answers and knowledge. Help your child to understand the question. Albert Einstein once said, “If I had an hour to solve a problem, I would spend 55 minutes thinking about the problem and 5 minutes thinking about solutions.”

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Question #2: “What have you done so far to solve this?”

 

Problem solving skills in children

This is a great question to help your child evaluate what they have done so far about it. Taking stock of the situation helps in charting the next step. May be your child was not approaching the question the right way. Your question will help them to take the next small step in solving the problem.

Question #3: “Where exactly are you facing the problem?”

Problem solving skills in children

May be your child does not need the answer for the entire question. In reality, they might be stuck at a tiny portion of the big problem. This question will help your child to divide the problem into sub-problems and think through these sub-problems one at a time.

Question #4: “Have you taken any class notes on it?”

Problem solving skills in children

Recollection is a great technique that helps us to remember something we have learned before. This question will help your child to go through their notes and recollect the discussion in the class.

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Question #5: “Did you talk to your friends about it?”

Problem solving skills in children

Your child’s classmates would be able to remind them of how the topic was tackled in the class. This is a great way for your child to understand the significance of collaboration and brainstorming in learning.

Is your child still struggling to solve the problem? Tell them not to panic. Give them the assurance that you are with them in their effort to solve the problem. Ask them more questions with hidden clues to lead them to think in the right direction.

Do not forget to congratulate your child for the efforts they made. Let them know the specific problem solving skills they used well so that they will feel empowered to use those skills to solve other issues as well. “Your perseverance helped you reach this far”, “It is your ability to divide the problems into sub-problems that helped to solve the problem”, “It is your ability to collaborate with others that helped you here”, “You are developing your problem solving skills well”, are some of the congratulatory phrases you can use to encourage and empower your child. After all, learning is all about acquiring new skills to solve problems.

Please visit Growth Mindset CampThinkers Unlimited Design Thinking CampThinkers Unlimited Workshop and Creative Problem Solving Workshop for our workshops on thinking skills and design thinking.

Share this article with your friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

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Junior Champs Leadership Camp designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking Camp

Design Thinking Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Growth Mindset Camp

Growth Mindset Workshop Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Junior Public Speaking & Confidence Building Workshop designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication.

NEW POSTER 6 copy

About Sindu Sreebhavan

Sindu Sreebhavan is the founder of As Many Minds Minds Pte Ltd and the chief editor of The Kidz Parade Edutainment magazine, Asia's premium publication for cultivating creativity and creative writing in children. Sindu is also the founder of International Youth Leadership and Innovation Forum (IYLIF). With a passion to infuse innovation in education and inject innovative mindset in people, Sindu writes, speaks and consults on innovation and creativity in business and education. She says innovation does not start with invention, it starts with a mindset. “The best gift you can give a child is the power of Confidence, Creativity and Communication” is her tagline. She is passionate about educating educators, parents and children about youth development, youth leadership, education innovation and 21st century education. She supports children, parents, schools and several organisations in these areas.

The Mathematically Challenged Child

“That is enough of fooling around, Nicole. You are doing finger counting. It is straight forward and there is no confusion. You are trying to make it sound like you are mathematically challenged. Stop all those silly excuses, focus and finish your work in two minutes. ”

Helen was fed up of her otherwise angelic eight year old daughter Nicole’s excuses to avoid Mathematics. Nicole hated Maths and Helen wanted to change Nicole’s attitude towards Maths.

But, Nicole was facing a much more difficult situation than Helen. Nicole found it weird that she was not able to understand the mathematical concepts most of her friends seemed to pick up from the class. She had difficulty in imagining a number line; she found it hard to count objects in groups, even when the group was as little as two to three objects.

At the age of 10, Nicole found it really annoying that her classmates said addition and subtraction was easy when she still had no clue about how it works. Her inability to do Maths reflected not only in her low Maths grades, her self-esteem was also shattered. Nicole felt no one is able to understand her situation. So, she did not share her worries with anyone, not even with Helen. Nicole started spending her time inside the locked doors of her room after school. Helen was worried, she felt she did not understand her daughter at all.

Nicole’s low confidence attracted bullies towards her. The next four years she suffered severe bullying, without the knowledge of her family. Panic attacks became part of her life.

Mathematically challenged child - dyscalculia

It was then that a new teacher joined the school. The teacher noticed Nicole’s behavior and her performance. She observed that Nicole was performing extremely well in writing and drawing. She advised Helen to test Nicole for dyscalculia.

The results came back positive for Nicole. She was diagnosed with dyscalculia at the age of 15. Nicole was mathematically challenged, but that was not a measure of her intelligence. Her test results came back with very high IQ scores. Her high IQ helped her breeze through all other subjects except Maths.

When Helen came to know about this relatively unknown learning difficulty, she felt guilty. She realized her child was not acting ‘mathematically challenged’. She realized it was not her child’s carelessness that resulted in her poor performance in Maths. She realized she needed to help her child. Nicole was relieved, as she did not need to blame herself for not getting the results for all the hard work she was putting in.

What is Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia is a brain disorder that causes severe difficulty in learning and comprehending arithmetic among the sufferers. It is also known as Mathematics Learning Disability and Math Dyslexia.

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What are the Symptoms of Dyscalculia

Have you ever felt that your child or a loved one is mathematically challenged? Do you think they could be suffering from Dyscalculia?

Helen gave me a list of symptoms she now thinks she had overlooked in the past. The list below also includes some pointers from AboutDyscalculia.org.

  • Difficulty in reading analog clocks

  • Difficulty in stating which of two numbers is larger (for example, is 6 larger or smaller than 4)

  • Particular difficulty with subtraction

  • Difficulty with multiplication tables

  • Difficulties with imagining a mental number line

  • Difficulties with finger counting

  • Many symptoms of dyslexia

  • Attention deficiency (not in all cases)

  • Anxiety towards maths

  • Difficulties with budgeting

You can find a comprehensive set of symptoms at AboutDyscalculia.org.

You may find these symptoms in many young children when they start to learn the concepts. So, instead of jumping into a panic mode, please take some time to assess whether your child’s confusion with numbers is age appropriate or it is something you need to really worry about. If you worry that your child could have this disability, please approach an expert for a diagnosis.

What is the Next Step if your Child gets diagnosed with Dyscalculia

Nicole got diagnosed at 15. So, the child who should have been diagnosed with dyscalculia and ADD when she was at least in primary school, did not receive the diagnosis and treatment until the age of 15. But, it still was not too late.

The parents got the counseling on how to deal with the situation. Helen and the whole family rallied behind Nicole to support her to regain her lost confidence. They moved Nicole to a school system that acknowledged and understood the condition. The new school supported her to pursue excellence in other areas of her life in spite of her disability. They got special permission from the examination board so that Nicole does not need to learn math as a subject. She still learned math, but that matched her ability to learn it.

Now, Nicole is a smart and confident 19 year old pursuing her undergraduate degree in Australia. She has proved herself to be a good writer and a stage artist. She is not learning math, but that is neither dampening her future nor her enthusiasm for learning.

The world is slowly coming to acknowledge Mathematics Learning Disability. Every year the Dyscalculia Day is held on the third day of March to spread the awareness about dyscalculia.

In Asian culture, Maths is given a lot of importance. There are a lot of gadgets and Apps in today’s world to support us with our day to day Mathematical needs. If a child is mathematically challenged, it does not stop them from achieving greatness and enjoying a  normal life.

If your child or a loved one gets diagnosed with dyscalculia, the best thing you can do is to accept and understand the situation. Once you become aware and understanding, it will be easier for you to find ways to support them. You can find a lot more information on dyscalculia at http://www.aboutdyscalculia.org and http://www.dyscalculia.org.

Please visit ACE Minds^ Workshop for our workshop on study skills and Growth Mindset Camp for mindset cultivating right mindset for academic and personal success.

Share this article with your friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

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You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Junior Champs Leadership Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Junior Champs Leadership Camp designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking Camp

Design Thinking Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Growth Mindset Camp

Growth Mindset Workshop Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Junior Public Speaking & Confidence Building Workshop designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication.

NEW POSTER 6 copy

About Sindu Sreebhavan

Sindu Sreebhavan is the founder of As Many Minds Minds Pte Ltd and the chief editor of The Kidz Parade Edutainment magazine, Asia's premium publication for cultivating creativity and creative writing in children. Sindu is also the founder of International Youth Leadership and Innovation Forum (IYLIF). With a passion to infuse innovation in education and inject innovative mindset in people, Sindu writes, speaks and consults on innovation and creativity in business and education. She says innovation does not start with invention, it starts with a mindset. “The best gift you can give a child is the power of Confidence, Creativity and Communication” is her tagline. She is passionate about educating educators, parents and children about youth development, youth leadership, education innovation and 21st century education. She supports children, parents, schools and several organisations in these areas.

This is How Bullying Could Affect Your Child’s Self-esteem

I was hurt, I was in pain, I was shattered.

What I had endured from the age of 10 to 14 years old had left deep emotional wounds that would not heal. It was easier to numb the pain by suppressing it and seeking other unhealthy ways of coping. The subconscious mind is a powerful thing. It controls our thoughts, feelings, and resulting behaviors. As much as I try to hide, ignore, or deny the pain of bullying, it is always there stored away in the subconscious part of my mind.

When it started I didn’t realize it really started.

bullying affect self-esteem

As a young child, I remember desperately wanting to be liked and accepted by my peers. At 10, I was at an impressionable age trying to discover who I was and where I fit in. The bullying I experienced was what many refer to as friendship bullying. Every friend I thought I had, at some point turned on me in a very vicious way through verbal, physical, and social bullying. They were the popular girls, and had a lot of social influence and power. As a result, when the bullying started, I had no one. When they turned on me, the entire school either participated in the bullying or stood by and did nothing.

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During the 80’s bullying was not taken seriously and was not even recognized as an issue that needed attention. It was considered a rite of passage and so, I had no support from the school or the teachers. I was alone. It was the single most painful experience of my life. The shame left me feeling unworthy of love and acceptance

My Self-esteem. My Thoughts. My Feelings. My Actions.

When we are bullied and continually beaten down with fists, words or through social humiliation, there is a cause and effect reaction that occurs. Our experience will begin to change the thoughts we consciously have about ourselves. Those thoughts then create feelings that are stored within our subconscious and ultimately determine our actions and behaviors. I’ll use my own experience to illustrate how Self-Esteem (thoughts about ourselves) trigger our feelings or emotions, that then result in our actions or behaviours.

The physical, verbal, and social bullying that I was subjected to for a period of over three years led to the following thoughts, feelings and actions.

My Thoughts

“No one likes me or cares about me.”

“Nothing good will ever happen to me.” 

“There’s something wrong with me.” 

“I’m not good enough.”

“I wish I was someone else.”

My Feelings 

Loneliness, hopelessness, anger, fear, self-consciousness, insecurity, and paranoia.

My Actions / Behaviors

I would criticise and gossip negatively about others to feel better about myself. I became outwardly aggressive towards others to feel powerful. I sought any form of attention that made me feel loved and accepted. I avoided social situations or new experiences so I wouldn’t feel inadequate or scared. I married and stayed with an alcoholic because I believed I didn’t deserve any better. I became a perfectionist at work because it gave me a false sense of worth and value. I always anticipated and thought the worst of every situation to protect myself from feeling disappointed or hurt. 

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The list goes on. Of course not everyone who is bullied will experience low self-esteem or have the same thoughts, feelings and behaviors. There are other factors that contribute to the severity of damage on ones sense of worth from bullying.  For example, support from schools and teachers, a child’s home environment, their resilience, and the duration of the abuse has a direct link to the severity of the effect.

In my case, I did not have the support of anyone and the duration was over a period of three years. My behaviours were clearly destructive and part of a cycle that created more feelings of guilt, resentment, fear, and sadness. In the process, I deprived myself of joy and happiness. I became someone I didn’t want to be, someone controlled by their emotions.

The longer we suffer from low self-esteem, the more habitual our thought patterns become and the more difficult it is to alter or change our behaviors. The good news is, we consciously choose our thoughts about ourselves. This is our “Self-Talk”.  We can choose to belittle and degrade ourselves, or we can be loving and accepting of who we are.

What can you do to help?

Do you know a child or an adult suffering from bullying? It is critical to understand a few factors if you want to help them.

1. Often it is the devastating shame they feel that keeps targets of bullying from talking about the emotional trauma.

2. Healing can only begin when we talk about the shame. To prevent possible long term mental health issues such as depression and anxiety, one must often relive the painful trauma and talk openly about how they are feeling. This should be done in a safe, trusting environment with a professional who understands the issue of bullying.

3. As parents and care givers we must have a heightened awareness of the bullying epidemic. Know the signs and if you suspect someone you care for is being bullied seek help.

4. We must never underestimate or minimize the profound effect bullying can have on one’s self-esteem and how that lack of self-esteem can drive unhealthy behaviours.

5. If you or someone you know is suffering from the residual effects of bullying please reach out for help.

Read 10 things every parent needs to know to protect their children from bullying to know more about how you can prevent, support and protect a child.

Share this article with your friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

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You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Junior Champs Leadership Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Junior Champs Leadership Camp designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking Camp

Design Thinking Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Growth Mindset Camp

Growth Mindset Workshop Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

Junior Public Speaking & Confidence Building Workshop designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp Growth Mindset Camp Thinkers Unlimited Design Thinking  Camp

The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication.

NEW POSTER 6 copy

About Angela Fryklund

Angela Fryklund is the founder of Beyond Bullying Recovery Services, Ontario, Canada. She works with people who want to recover from the emotional effects of bullying and to restore their self-worth. She is also a speaker and speaks to youth on the potential long-term mental health issues related to bullying by sharing her own personal story. Angela is a certified professional coach with the Certified Coaches Federation of Canada and also with the John Maxwell Team.

Digital Footprint: A Letter to My Children

To my wonderful Tweens,

When I was young, I have made several mistakes. But, I am lucky. None of those are googleable. They are not part of my digital footprint. My mistakes are safe with me. But, are you lucky like me? Unfortunately, the answer is NO.  If you make any mistakes in your adolescent years or later, the chances are that it could leave a mark here on the internet. As you are creating your digital footprint online, I would like you to be aware of these 10 tips for your safe riding online and offline.

1. To be online is like driving. 

Digital footprint for children

Half of the children of your age use social media. The internet makes your life easy in several ways… just like driving. But, just like driving, you need to be educated on how to do it and you need to be careful. At the same time, you also need to be beware of the dangers caused by other people’s carelessness and arrogance.

So when you drive online, drive safely and defensively.

2. Colleges and employers will check your online profiles and behavior.

digital footprint for children

A few years back, the respected educator Chris Betcher said,I can see a day in the not too distant future where your ‘digital footprint’ will carry far more weight than anything you might include in a resume or CV”. That day has come.

Soon you will start building your portfolios for higher studies. Keep in mind that your online behavior is also part of that portfolio. Build your online presence with the same sincerety with which you build your portfolio.

Your digital footprint is as important as your achievements.

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3. When you are in front of that screen, you may feel powerful. 

digital footprint for children

In reality, you are much more powerless than the powerful feeling you get. The freedom that the internet gives you to do anything online looks very powerful. The fact that you are away from other people does not give you the super power to share anything you want to say about others. It keeps records.

If you do anything illegal online, law enforcement agencies could come and get you. And yes, there is proof for everything you do. The search engines and other online platforms do provide it to the police and other law enforcement agencies.

The internet keeps records.

4. It is not just you, I should also be careful.

digital footprint for children

Be careful about what you post online. Your digital footprint will play a significant role in the opportunities you will get in the future. But, it is not just about you being careful. It is more applicable to be me as well. As a parent, I should be conscious of what information about you that I let the world see.

Parents are also responsible to keep a clean digital footprint of their children.

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5. There is no actual DELETE button online.

digital footprint for children

Pressing the DELETE button is not an actual ERASE online. Even if you go great lengths to hide or delete your online activities, there are ways to find it out.

There are many online social media platforms that claim your posts disappear forever. If they were so reliable, how can we find some pictures and posts by your favorite celebrities on those platforms even after it expires?

It is not just the internet that keeps track of your activities, it is also your online friends.

Remember, there are no secrets online. So, take control of  your digital footprint.

6. Internet is not the place where you throw your frustrations towards a person.

digital footprint for children

No matter how mean a person is, please do not show your frustration towards them online. Being mean or spreading rumors about a person online is cyber bullying.

The simple rule of thumb is, if it is not right to say or do something in the real world, do not say or do that online too.

 

7. Internet is for everyone.

digital footprint for children

That means, you will find all sorts of people out there. Some of them do things that you wouldn’t even be able to imagine. There are people who steal identities, steal valuables, bully others or harm others under the disguise of online friendships. There are people who could manipulate you to do things you wouldn’t be proud of. They could be sitting anywhere in the world, but could cause great damages to you and to your loved ones.

Do not trust any strangers you come across online, however beautiful, handsome or wise they may appear.

8. The internet is forever.

digital footprint for children

When you press that SEND button or PUBLISH button, it is ‘forever’. I am sure you know about that. It is you who should decide what legacy you want to leave behind.

Build a positive self image online. Who are you as a person? What are your qualities that make you yourself? Your online image should give the same or a better impression about yourself.

Haven’t I told you not to share your personal information with people you see on the streets? Please keep that in mind when you are on the streets of the internet too. Keep your private information private.

The internet is here to stay and hence your digital footprint too.

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9. You get what you search. 

digital footprint for children

Do you always search about a particular topic? Do you always watch a particular genre on youtube? What sort of games you play or download? Social media and phishing sites are keeping track of all these online habits of yours. This also becomes part of your digital footprint.

If you observe you will realise that social media offers you contents based on your online habits. So, even if you want to curb some of those habits, you will continuously get tempted by those offers.

Curb your tendencies and temptations online to have a healthy digital footprint.

10. I am writing this now because this is the right time

Digital footprint for children

After a couple of years, it is possible that you might not feel like listening to me. You may feel that your friends make more sense than me. I won’t blame you for that because that is part of nature and growing up. So, before you reach that stage, it is my responsibility to make you independent to watch out for yourself. When I grew up, I didn’t have to face all this. I know I am also learning these things with you. But, we will do it together.

No matter what, I will be there for you.

If someone is troubling you online, please do not hide it from me. My approach might be different from yours when it comes to handling situations. But, we will discuss it and reach an approach you are comfortable with.

Even if you think you have made a mistake, come back and tell me. I might scold you, I might shout at you, I might cry for you. But, I will be there for you to support you, to love you and protect you.

You will understand the full meaning of many of the things I wrote here only when you get a little bit older. But, you will be able to figure that out by yourself if you start now with the basics of creating a clean digital footprint.

With all my love,

Mom.

Please visit Social Media & Online Etiquette Workshop for our workshop on safe digital footprint for children.

Share this article with your children, friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

Public Speaking Camp designed by the World Champion of Public Speaking

Public Speaking for children Singapore

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The Kidz Parade Magazine 

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About Sindu Sreebhavan

Sindu Sreebhavan is the founder of As Many Minds Minds Pte Ltd and the chief editor of The Kidz Parade Edutainment magazine, Asia's premium publication for cultivating creativity and creative writing in children. Sindu is also the founder of International Youth Leadership and Innovation Forum (IYLIF). With a passion to infuse innovation in education and inject innovative mindset in people, Sindu writes, speaks and consults on innovation and creativity in business and education. She says innovation does not start with invention, it starts with a mindset. “The best gift you can give a child is the power of Confidence, Creativity and Communication” is her tagline. She is passionate about educating educators, parents and children about youth development, youth leadership, education innovation and 21st century education. She supports children, parents, schools and several organisations in these areas.