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Digital Footprint: A Letter to My Children

To my wonderful Tweens,

When I was young, I have made several mistakes. But, I am lucky. None of those are googleable. My mistakes are safe with me. But, are you lucky like me? Unfortunately, the answer is NO.  If you make any mistakes in your adolescent years or later, the chances are that it could leave a mark here on the internet. As you are creating your digital footprint online, I would like you to be aware of these 10 tips for your safe riding online and offline.

1. To be online is like driving. 

Digital footprint for children

Half of the children of your age use social media. The internet makes your life easy in several ways… just like driving. But, just like driving, you need to be educated on how to do it and you need to be careful. At the same time, you also need to be beware of the dangers caused by other people’s carelessness and arrogance.

So when you drive online, drive safely and defensively.

2. Colleges and employers will check your online profiles and behavior.

digital footprint for children

A few years back, the respected educator Chris Betcher said,I can see a day in the not too distant future where your ‘digital footprint’ will carry far more weight than anything you might include in a resume or CV”. That day has come.

Soon you will start building your portfolios for higher studies. Keep in mind that your online behavior is also part of that portfolio. Build your online presence with the same sincerety with which you build your portfolio.

Your digital footprint is as important as your achievements.

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3. When you are in front of that screen, you may feel powerful. 

digital footprint for children

In reality, you are much more powerless than the powerful feeling you get. The freedom that the internet gives you to do anything online looks very powerful. The fact that you are away from other people does not give you the super power to share anything you want to say about others. It keeps records.

If you do anything illegal online, law enforcement agencies could come and get you. And yes, there is proof for everything you do. The search engines and other online platforms do provide it to the police and other law enforcement agencies.

The internet keeps records.

4. It is not just you, I should also be careful.

digital footprint for children

Be careful about what you post online. Your digital footprint will play a significant role in the opportunities you will get in the future. But, it is not just about you being careful. It is more applicable to be me as well. As a parent, I should be conscious of what information about you that I let the world see.

Parents are also responsible to keep a clean digital footprint of their children.

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5. There is no actual DELETE button online.

digital footprint for children

Pressing the DELETE button is not an actual ERASE online. Even if you go great lengths to hide or delete your online activities, there are ways to find it out.

There are many online social media platforms that claim your posts disappear forever. If they were so reliable, how can we find some pictures and posts by your favorite celebrities on those platforms even after it expires?

It is not just the internet that keeps track of your activities, it is also your online friends.

Remember, there are no secrets online. So, take control of  your digital footprint.

6. Internet is not the place where you throw your frustrations towards a person.

digital footprint for children

No matter how mean a person is, please do not show your frustration towards them online. Being mean or spreading rumors about a person online is cyber bullying.

The simple rule of thumb is, if it is not right to say or do something in the real world, do not say or do that online too.

7. Internet is for everyone.

digital footprint for children

That means, you will find all sorts of people out there. Some of them do things that you wouldn’t even be able to imagine. There are people who steal identities, steal valuables, bully others or harm others under the disguise of online friendships. There are people who could manipulate you to do things you wouldn’t be proud of. They could be sitting anywhere in the world, but could cause great damages to you and to your loved ones.

Do not trust any strangers you come across online, however beautiful, handsome or wise they may appear.

8. The internet is forever.

digital footprint for children

When you press that SEND button or PUBLISH button, it is ‘forever’. I am sure you know about that. It is you who should decide what legacy you want to leave behind.

Build a positive self image online. Who are you as a person? What are your qualities that make you yourself? Your online image should give the same or a better impression about yourself.

Haven’t I told you not to share your personal information with people you see on the streets? Please keep that in mind when you are on the streets of the internet too. Keep your private information private.

The internet is here to stay and hence your digital footprint too.

9. You get what you search. 

digital footprint for children

Do you always search about a particular topic? Do you always watch a particular genre on youtube? What sort of games you play or download? Social media and phishing sites are keeping track of all these online habits of yours. This also becomes part of your digital footprint.

If you observe you will realise that social media offers you contents based on your online habits. So, even if you want to curb some of those habits, you will continuously get tempted by those offers.

Curb your tendencies and temptations online to have a healthy digital footprint.

10. I am writing this now because this is the right time

Digital footprint for children

After a couple of years, it is possible that you might not feel like listening to me. You may feel that your friends make more sense than me. I won’t blame you for that because that is part of nature and growing up. So, before you reach that stage, it is my responsibility to make you independent to watch out for yourself. When I grew up, I didn’t have to face all this. I know I am also learning these things with you. But, we will do it together.

No matter what, I will be there for you.

If someone is troubling you online, please do not hide it from me. My approach might be different from yours when it comes to handling situations. But, we will discuss it and reach an approach you are comfortable with.

Even if you think you have made a mistake, come back and tell me. I might scold you, I might shout at you, I might cry for you. But, I will be there for you to support you, to love you and protect you.

You will understand the full meaning of many of the things I wrote here only when you get a little bit older. But, you will be able to figure that out by yourself if you start now with the basics of creating a clean digital footprint.

With all my love,

Mom.

Please visit Social Media & Online Etiquette Workshop for our workshop on safe digital footprint for children.

Share this article with your children, friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

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The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication. NEW POSTER 6 copy

Public Speaking Camp

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About Sindu Sreebhavan

Sindu Sreebhavan is the founder of As Many Minds Minds Pte Ltd and the chief editor of The Kidz Parade Edutainment magazine, Asia's premium publication for cultivating creativity and creative writing in children. Sindu is also the founder of International Youth Leadership and Innovation Forum (IYLIF). With a passion to infuse innovation in education and inject innovative mindset in people, Sindu writes, speaks and consults on innovation and creativity in business and education. She says innovation does not start with invention, it starts with a mindset. “The best gift you can give a child is the power of Confidence, Creativity and Communication” is her tagline. She is passionate about educating educators, parents and children about youth development, youth leadership, education innovation and 21st century education. She supports children, parents, schools and several organisations in these areas.

7 Science-Backed Ways to Motivate your Child to Study

Do you think your child is able to achieve more than what they are currently getting? Many parents feel their children’s priorities are mixed up. They fear that because of this, their child’s potential to become a stellar student diminishes. This results in continuous arguments, punishments, disappointments and frustration in the home atmosphere. Have you found it hard to motivate your child to study?

You may find usual motivational phrases like “I know you have much more potential than this”, or “You can do it…” are not working anymore. What can you do in this situation? What if you give your child transformational experience using of some simple, but planned strategies?

1. It is easier to motivate your child to study if they know how learning works

motivate your child to study

Our brain continues to change over the course of our lives. For every new information, our nerve cells (neurons) in the brain form new connections with other cells or strengthen the existing connection. The more we learn, the neurons make more connections and that results in us becoming more intelligent. According to researchers, your task to motivate your child to study gets better response once your child gets to know this.

Your child needs to understand that their intelligence is not fixed at birth. Brain is similar to muscles in our body. The more we work it out, the stronger it gets. That means your child has the potential to go up from where they are. When they understand it, they are more likely to understand the importance of efforts and determination. They are more likely to take responsibility for their academic progress. With this growth mindset, they gain greater confidence in themselves. Based on the research by Stanford University psychology professor and writer Carol Dweck, even low achieving students started scoring better in exams after they got to know how learning works.

2. Homework ≠ Learning

 motivate your child to study

When you ask, “Did you finish studying?” does your child say, “Yes. I finished my homework”? Studying and doing homework are entirely separate tasks. Homework is a task designed to enforce the concepts introduced at school. Learning is following certain strategies to ensure that the child internalizes the information and will be able to remember and make use of it.

There are several studies with contradicting conclusions on the effectiveness of homework. Irrespective of that, your child anyway has to do their homework, if they get it.  In order for your child to internalize what they learned, follow a planned approach to learning.

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3. Encourage your child to RECALL the learning

motivate your child to study

When we read something, we feel we have understood and remember everything. How often has it happened that you checked the time many times and still you do not know what time it is? Similarly, when a person reads something, although they may feel they picked up everything, there will l still be some information that just does not stick. Ebbinghaus forgetting curve hypothesis establishes that we forget half of what we learn within 3 weeks and this memory deterioration continues over the period of time unless we take effective measures to keep the memory alive.

Let your child take intervals in between their reading and recollect what they learned.

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According to the book Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning, the retrieving process during the recalling, helps to build stronger connections in the brain. These connections will lock information into memory.

4. CONNECT the learning to something your child already knows

motivate your child to study

Learning is all about making connections. Teach them to relate the new things they learned to something they already know. For example, if they are learning how to write a story, let them analyse the structure of their favorite story. If you say photosynthesis is like baking when they are learning about photosynthesis, they will try to associate every step of photosynthesis with steps of baking. Connecting new information with something they already know will help them in sticking the information and retrieving it later. When your child gets this technique, it will be easier for them to give a personal angle to every new information they learn.

5. Start the habit of WRITING the achievements of the day

motivate your child to study

As part a study by Harvard Business School, the researchers observed that individuals who were given time to reflect on a task improved their performance more than those who were given the same amount of time to practice with the same task.

Here is another study that highlights the benefits of writing life experiences in the physical, psychological and academic life of a child.

Your child will make efforts to make big improvements when they start noticing the small improvements they make on a daily basis.

6. Low achievers need to know they are NOT stupid

motivate your child to study

Your child needs to understand that it is okay to have setbacks. Setbacks are not failures. They need to identify themselves as learners, not score-seekers. A low score just means they need to work harder on the subject. You can help your child to figure out the tricks that will work better for them.

7. Discuss, set and enforce rules

motivate your child to study

As a parent, your interest is to see your child performing better. It is important for the parent to understand that both you and your child are in this together. The lesser the power struggle here, the more will be the likelihood of a better outcome.

Discuss and establish the basic rules of their learning process with your child. This will involve the duration of study, sticking to study timings, how you will assess the progress of their study, what is the new course of action, what will be the action if things do not go as planned and so on. Once your child gets involved in this, they are more likely to take the ownership to make it work.

When you motivate your child to study, please keep in mind that you should be giving your child more than motivational words. Give your child the “How to…” strategies when it comes to studying. They will be more open to incorporate that in their learning.

Are you interested in learning how you could help your child to learn the art of thinking? You might be interested in this.

Please visit ACE Minds^ Workshop for our workshop on study skills.

Share this article with your friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

Junior Public Speaking & Confidence Building Workshop

Public Speaking for children Singapore

The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication. NEW POSTER 6 copy

Public Speaking Camp

public speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Junior Champs Leadership Camp

 Junior Champs Leadership Camp

Public Speaking for children

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp

About Sindu Sreebhavan

Sindu Sreebhavan is the founder of As Many Minds Minds Pte Ltd and the chief editor of The Kidz Parade Edutainment magazine, Asia's premium publication for cultivating creativity and creative writing in children. Sindu is also the founder of International Youth Leadership and Innovation Forum (IYLIF). With a passion to infuse innovation in education and inject innovative mindset in people, Sindu writes, speaks and consults on innovation and creativity in business and education. She says innovation does not start with invention, it starts with a mindset. “The best gift you can give a child is the power of Confidence, Creativity and Communication” is her tagline. She is passionate about educating educators, parents and children about youth development, youth leadership, education innovation and 21st century education. She supports children, parents, schools and several organisations in these areas.

5 Effective Ways To Build Your Child’s Vocabulary

A strong vocabulary paves the way for a child’s ability to learn, their ability to understand the world and their ability to communicate effectively with other people. The more words they know, the more they are able to make sense of what they learn. Now, what can you do to build your child’s vocabulary? Research shows that a child needs to see the usage of a word 5-7 times, before it is stored in their long-term memory. Here are some specific tips to make the vocabulary acquisition more fun.

1. Word games

5 Effective Ways To Build Your Child's Vocabulary

Children learn vocabulary the best with repeated exposure and opportunity to practice that in a non-threatening atmosphere. Games are best to enforce the words after you introduce it to them. You can do inexpensive ways to play games like synonym cross word puzzles, Word search, Scrabble. There are many online sites where you can play interesting and engaging vocabulary games with your child. If you need more, you can find some cool vocabulary games here.

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2. Peer reading

5 effective ways to build your child's vocabulary

Introduce your child to the vocabulary used by their peers. Reading literature by children is the best way to do that. This will give them the motivation and confidence to learn and use new words. Reading the works by peers will also inspire them to focus more on writing. You will be able to find a lot of such literature at Kidz Parade literature by children and The Kidz Parade.

3. Keep an idea book or a journal

5 effective ways to build your child's vocabulary

Does the word ‘journal’ put off your child? Introduce the concept of an ‘idea book’ to them instead. Let them write all their aspirations, imaginations and observations in that book.

Encourage them to write lists if they do not want to write long paragraphs, ask them to write only a couple of sentences every day when they start with, ask them to write about something close to their heart. You will see your child building vocabulary and writing skills gradually.

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Research shows that writing journals has both physical and psychological benefits while improving their writing skills and vocabulary.

You can find many writing prompts here.

4. Read aloud to your child (even if they are older)

Build your child's vocabulary

Jim Trelease, the author of Read-Aloud Handbook says, “Children have a reading level and a listening level and they are usually not the same. A 4th-grader may be reading on a 4th-grade level, but can listen to stories on a 6th-grade level.”

You can read aloud to older children, even to those who are upto 14 years. Reading aloud to teens helps them with finding the right vocabulary to express their emotions. This is a great bonding activity, while building your child’s vocabulary.

5. Talk, Talk and Talk: A very effective way to build your child’s vocabulary

5 effective ways to build your child's vocabulary

Learning words is helpful only if it is practiced. Have conversations with your child in various topics. This will give them the opportunity to listen to new vocabulary as well as to express their thoughts using the new vocabulary. Communicating with people with varied interests is also a great way to acquire new vocabulary.

Share this article with your friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

Junior Public Speaking & Confidence Building Workshop

Public Speaking for children Singapore

The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication. NEW POSTER 6 copy

Public Speaking Camp

public speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Junior Champs Leadership Camp

 Junior Champs Leadership Camp

Public Speaking for children

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp

About Sindu Sreebhavan

Sindu Sreebhavan is the founder of As Many Minds Minds Pte Ltd and the chief editor of The Kidz Parade Edutainment magazine, Asia's premium publication for cultivating creativity and creative writing in children. Sindu is also the founder of International Youth Leadership and Innovation Forum (IYLIF). With a passion to infuse innovation in education and inject innovative mindset in people, Sindu writes, speaks and consults on innovation and creativity in business and education. She says innovation does not start with invention, it starts with a mindset. “The best gift you can give a child is the power of Confidence, Creativity and Communication” is her tagline. She is passionate about educating educators, parents and children about youth development, youth leadership, education innovation and 21st century education. She supports children, parents, schools and several organisations in these areas.

Science Says Your Child Should Start Writing Journals

In a 2003 study, cited in Royal College of Psychiatrists, Karen A. Baikie and Kay Wilhelm highligts the long-term and short-term positive effects of writing about life experiences. The study outlines why your child should start writing journals.

“Fill your paper with the breathings of your heart.” –  William Wordsworth.

Expressive writing about emotional, traumatic and stressful events results in significantly better psychological and physical well being. Where can your child find these experiences? Of course, in their day to day lives.

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Why your child should start writing journals?

The study showed significant improvements in the following areas when you cultivate a habit of writing about life experiences.

  1. Higher grades for students
  2. Improved working memory
  3. Reduced depressive symptoms before examinations
  4. Improved social behaviour
  5. Improved sports performance
  6. Improved mood
  7. Greater psychological well being
  8. Improved lung function
  9. Improved liver function
  10. Fewer days in hospital

How your child should start writing journals?

You might be wondering how you can ensure your child is doing the expressive writing in the right conditions.

  1. Provide a correct statement of the facts of the situation your child is writing on.
  2. Ensure that the writing reveals the subsconscious thought processes. Let them include their deepest thoughts and feelings in their writing.
  3. Your child is able to discuss the writing with a person close to them.
  4. Your child is able to write freely about the topic
  5. Your child expresses the emotions verbally in their writing.

When and where your child should start writing journals?

It is also important to provide the right environment to your child so that your child will be able to function their best. We have some tips for that.

  • Set a particular time of the day for expressive writing
  • Do not write at bedtime. This helps especially if they are writing about an unpleasant experience.

This strategy of writing works for both children and adults. Cultivating expressive writing in children is probably a great strategy for improving the writing skills while enjoying all the physical and psychological benefits it offers.

Share this article with your friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

Junior Public Speaking & Confidence Building Workshop

Public Speaking for children Singapore

The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication. NEW POSTER 6 copy

Public Speaking Camp

public speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Junior Champs Leadership Camp

 Junior Champs Leadership Camp

Public Speaking for children

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp

About Sindu Sreebhavan

Sindu Sreebhavan is the founder of As Many Minds Minds Pte Ltd and the chief editor of The Kidz Parade Edutainment magazine, Asia's premium publication for cultivating creativity and creative writing in children. Sindu is also the founder of International Youth Leadership and Innovation Forum (IYLIF). With a passion to infuse innovation in education and inject innovative mindset in people, Sindu writes, speaks and consults on innovation and creativity in business and education. She says innovation does not start with invention, it starts with a mindset. “The best gift you can give a child is the power of Confidence, Creativity and Communication” is her tagline. She is passionate about educating educators, parents and children about youth development, youth leadership, education innovation and 21st century education. She supports children, parents, schools and several organisations in these areas.

Learning Soft Skills Could Help Your Child To Be a Successful Adult

Academic learning is usually in the spotlight at school, but teaching elementary-age students “soft” skills like self-control and how to get along with others might help to keep at-risk kids out of criminal trouble in the future, a study finds. Several studies have underlined how learning soft skills could help your child to be successful as an adult.

Duke University researchers looked at a program called Fast Track, which was started in the early 1990s for children who were identified by their teachers and parents to be at high risk for developing aggressive behavioral problems.

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The students were randomized into two groups; half took part in the intervention, which included a teacher-led curriculum, parent training groups, academic tutoring and lessons in self-control and social skills. The program, which lasted from first grade through 10th grade, reduced delinquency, arrests and use of health and mental health services as the students aged through adolescence and young adulthood, as researchers explained in a separate study published earlier this year.

In the latest study, researchers looked at the “why” behind those previous findings. In looking at the data from nearly 900 students, the researchers found that about a third of the impact on future crime outcomes was due to the social and self-regulation skills the students learned from ages 6 to 11.

The academic skills that were taught as part of Fast Track turned out to have less of an impact on crime and delinquency rates than did the soft skills, which are associated with emotional intelligence. Soft skills might include teaching kids to work cooperatively in a group or teaching them how to think about the long-term consequences when they make a decision. Teaching physics is an example of a hard skill.

“The conclusion that we would make is that these [soft] skills should be emphasized even more in our education system and in our system of socializing children,” says Kenneth Dodge, a professor of public policy and of psychology and neuroscience at Duke who was a principal investigator in this study as well as in the original Fast Track project. Parents should do all they can to promote these skills with their children, Dodge says, as should education policymakers.

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“To the extent we can improve those skills, we can improve outcomes in delinquency and juvenile crime,” says Dodge, who is also director of Duke’s Center for Child and Family Policy. The study was published in the journal Child Development.

To Neil Bernstein, a psychologist in Washington, D.C., who specializes in child and adolescent behavior disorders, the researchers’ findings seem consistent with what he’s seen on the ground in working with children for more than 30 years. And while he says he agrees with the importance of teaching self-control and social skills, he would add empathy to the list, too.

“Empathy is what makes us aware of the feelings of others, and when you’re empathic, you’re much less likely to hurt someone else’s feelings,” says Bernstein, who serves on the advisory board for the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids and is the author of multiple books, including How to Keep Your Teenager Out of Trouble and What to Do if You Can’t.

Being in tune with how someone else feels might also make adolescents steer clear of bullying and other “behaviors of concern,” Bernstein says.

Empathy was not one of the skills that was directly measured in this study, according to Lucy Sorensen, a Ph.D. student at Duke and lead author of the study. But there were several measures of “prosocial behavior,” Sorensen says, defined as voluntary behavior intended to benefit others.

While Bernstein thinks the study’s findings are meaningful and could potentially serve as a model for schools, he says that collectively getting a school system, teachers, parents and students all motivated enough to take part in an intervention like Fast Track is challenging.

Several parts of the Fast Track study have been picked up successfully in other school settings, Sorensen says, such as a social-emotional learning curriculum called Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies, or PATHS. Programs like Fast Track need buy-in from school systems, teachers and parents, she says, and that can be a tough sell. But she adds that it’s a strength of Fast Track that the students get support both at school and at home.

“There’s a growing and new understanding of what it takes to be successful as an adolescent and an adult,” Dodge says. “It used to be that what we thought all it took was academic skills. Reading and math are very important for tasks that require reading and math. Self-control is important for life tasks that require self-control — that’s what avoiding arrest and violent crime is all about.”

Share this article with your friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

Source: NPR

Junior Public Speaking & Confidence Building Workshop

Public Speaking for children Singapore

The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication. NEW POSTER 6 copy

Public Speaking Camp

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You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Junior Champs Leadership Camp

 Junior Champs Leadership Camp

Public Speaking for children

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp

About AMM Research

As Many Minds Research Team www.AsManyMinds.com

Creative Problem Solving: 3 tips to boost your child’s creative problem solving skills

The boy was bright-eyed and eager as he listened in rapt attention. “…And who here can tell me the difference between tuition and enrichment?” I asked, hoping to elicit a discussion and end the News Analysis segment in my class. Everyone kept mum, seemingly deep in thought save for that boy. He took out a pair of highlighters and, using the pen caps, demonstrated visually the crucial difference, even if he could not articulate his ideas as well. Are we really investing time to teach creative problem solving skills to our children?

Going back to the scene in the class, was that a creative expression by that boy? It certainly was to me! I teach English and Literature. As part of the curriculum, I make it a point to discuss news and current affairs with the Primary School children in my class. Often, academia emphasizes rote learning and over time, we unwittingly penalise or even punish our children for expressing themselves in ways that do not conform to some preconceived standards. From my experience, there are three ways in which we can help our children think creatively and critically and help them learn creative problem solving.

1. Stop your internal critic. Problem solving skills flourish in an open environment.

Problem solving skills in children

As adults, thinking and rationalising comes easily for us and hence it is easy to forget that the same do not apply to children. While it might appear to us that the child is saying something nonsensical, this may not be the case from the child’s point of view. For example, you might have asked a child to come up with an idea to solve the issue of animal abuse. Technically, it isn’t wrong if the child said, “Well, let’s just hang everyone who abuses animals, then!”

2. Encourage your child to consider different angles of the problem

Problem solving skills in children

Certainly, I am not asking you to applaud and congratulate the child for his brilliance. However, one important aspect of getting to a creative solution is to think about the limitations of the real world. Faced with such an answer, I might probe further and ask, “That is a start, but why isn’t this the case in the real world? What do you think stops the government from hanging just about everyone who abuses an animal?”

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This gets them relating your initial question to the real world, and encourages them to think about various angles to a problem without being unduly discouraged. You are giving a nod to your child to expand his problem solving skills.

3. Don’t be afraid to reframe your question in ways that cater to your child’s strengths.

Problem solving skills in children

Are your children more physical and active? Or do they prefer the comforts of solitary introspection? Do they like Math more than English? Depending on your child’s strengths, you could re-frame the same question in a variety of ways and get them to answer it as a problem sum, an awareness campaign, a poem or an essay.

When teaching some of my students Cloze Passages, I find that I have to teach them some of the fundamental strategies in dealing with these components. I knew that one of them was a Maths genius who had represented his school in various Olympiad competitions. I also knew that just a verbatim presentation of tips and tricks would not help him to assimilate these strategies.

Instead of a cloze passage, I turned into a Maths teacher and gave him an Olympiad question on geometry. His whole body tensed up and he demanded writing paper, eager to work out the answer. Once he was finished, I asked him about the method he used to derive that answer. He could tell me the exact method as well as the question types for which the method would be applicable.

“Great!” I said, “And that’s exactly the same principle behind the techniques for dealing with cloze passages that I’m about to show you.” Did it take more time? Yes. However, learning is not about how fast you can absorb a concept, but whether you have fully absorbed it. When a teacher adopts creative problem solving skills in dealing with a classroom challenge, the students too get introduced to dealing with a challenging situation in intuitive ways.  That student went on to score very well for his Paper 2 components in the mid-year examinations.

As parents and educators, we know that every child is different. However, are we adapting to their needs and giving them space to be creative and to express themselves in diverse ways? Are we giving them enough space to expand their problem solving skills? Through these three tips, I hope I have given you a good start to encouraging your children to become better and more creative thinkers!

Share this article with your friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

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Public Speaking for children Singapore

The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication. NEW POSTER 6 copy

Public Speaking Camp

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You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Junior Champs Leadership Camp

 Junior Champs Leadership Camp

Public Speaking for children

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp

About AMM Research

As Many Minds Research Team www.AsManyMinds.com

Exams are over and the hectic projects and group studies are taking a break. Are you in the look out for spending some quality time with your child during these holidays? We have compiled the list of 5 must-do holiday activities in Singapore where not just your child, but you can also have a great time.

1. Inter Play at Science Centre Singapore 

Holiday activities Singapore

This is a unique experiential exhibition that blends art, science and technology. There are many highlights that refect the interconnectedness of digital technology with our day to day lives. You can  blast off on a journey through the universe or populate an ocean with sea creatures of their own design.

Not to miss highlights of the exhibition are Deep Space, a multi-dimensional space and Kinetic Light Sculpture.

You can collaborate with the artist to create a multi-coloured digital painting based on the movement of a visitor’s silhouette. You can view digital enhancements that bring various artworks to life. You can also create your own multi-coloured digital painting from your silhouette.

Dates: 30 May 2015 – 16 Aug 2015

For more information, visit INTER PLAY .

2. My Favourite 70’s Show

Holiday activities Singapore

Are you a 70’s kid? What was your favourite television shows from the 70’s? What are your child’s favourite cartoons? This is a great bonding activity where you can illustrate a storyline with your child and bring it to life on your TV box.

This fun activity is not open every day. The workshop is limited to 30 pairs of parent and child. So, remember to register onsite in advance.

Dates: 30 May 2015 – 27 Jun 2015

For more information, visit My Favourite 70’s Show.

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3. Mangrove walk at Sungei Buloh

Holiday activities Singapore

Is your child a nature enthusiast? Or do you want to provide a nature experience to your child in urban Singapore? Take a few hours off from the concrete jungle and take a mangrove walk in the natural jungle of Sungei Buloh. You can spot mudskippers, crabs, shellfish, monitor lizards and various bird families here.

For more information, visit Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve.

Dates: Year round

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4. Children’s garden at Gardens by the Bay

Holiday activities Singapore

With separate play areas for all age groups, this is the place you can have a quality time with your family. Bring along your swimming gears and get drenched in the aquatic playzone.

Dates: Year round

For more information, visit Children’s Garden

5. Opera In The Park

Holiday activities Singapore

Go with your friends and family for a picnic at the Botanic Garden and watch the opera. Opera in the park is an outreach program that aims to expand the opera experience to a wider audience. The event offers popular favourites from musicals and operas.

Dates: Year round

For more information, visit Opera In The Park.

Have you done any of these holiday activities? What is your feedback?

Share this article with your friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

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Public Speaking for children Singapore

The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication. NEW POSTER 6 copy

Public Speaking Camp

public speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Junior Champs Leadership Camp

 Junior Champs Leadership Camp

Public Speaking for children

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp

About AMM Research

As Many Minds Research Team www.AsManyMinds.com

Are you wondering how to keep your child’s screen time more productive? You are not alone. Many of us are with you. Is your child hooked on to fun Apps? What if the Apps can provide some fun learning opportunities? We have picked our favorite fun educational games on Math and programming for your teens and tweens. These Apps not only help reinforcing the learning from the classroom but also are great aids to engage the kids during school holidays.

1. SMART Adventures Mission Math – Peril at the Pyramids

fun educational games

Set among the pyramids of Egypt, this game makes use of your child’s Math skills to solve a mystery. Kids will play a set of fun and interactive games with various difficulty levels to sove the mystery. It reinforces many math skills that the kids learn at school.

Age – 9 to 11 year olds

Smart Adventures

2. My Robot Friend

fun educational games

This is a great game that comes with lots of brainteasers that helps your child to pick up programming skills, logic and reasoning. As the name suggests, there is a “robot friend” in it. Your child can redesign the appearance of the robot by making use of the 200 different options available in the game.

Age – 9 to 12 year olds

My Robot Friend

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3. Questimate

fun educational games

This is an incredibly interactive game where kids take the role of question makers as well as solvers. The kids are invoved in making word problems and estimating answers. A unique game to practice estimation firsthand.

Age – 9 to 16 year olds

Questimate

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4. Cargo-bot

fun educational games

Programming concepts in general are a bit difficult for a novice to understand. This game inspires your child to think like a programmer. It is a puzzle game that challenges your child’s brain and teach them the concepts of programming. It asks your child to direct a robotic arm to a particular location. The best thing about this game is it makes programming look fun. It is challenging, but nevertheless fun for your child.

Age – 8 to 16 year olds

Cargo-bot

5. Marble Math

fun educational games

Your child can practice Math by dragging through a series of mazes. This is a fun game to reinforce mathematical concepts. The customization options available in the game makes it more impressive.

Age – 9 to 12+ year olds

Marble Math

Share this article with your friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

Junior Public Speaking & Confidence Building Workshop

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The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication. NEW POSTER 6 copy

Public Speaking Camp

public speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Junior Champs Leadership Camp

 Junior Champs Leadership Camp

Public Speaking for children

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp

About AMM Research

As Many Minds Research Team www.AsManyMinds.com

“I do not know what to do. His exam scores are appalling. But, I can’t blame him. My poor child… he puts his heart and soul into his studies. But, he finds it difficult to concentrate and recall all that he had studied. He was not like this before. Is it a behavioral problem?” Catherine (name changed for this article) could not stop worrying as John’s (name changed for this article) exam dates were approaching.

Catherine was relieved when she came to know that there could be reasons other than psychological issues for John’s problems.

John was the typical ‘king of junk food’ guy. He always had a love for french fries, cola, and donuts. In the past, Catherine used to control his intake of junk food. But, for the past few months, Catherine had been a bit relaxed on these. But, it had taken a toll on John’s health. In fact, that was the cause for the memory issues he was facing.

Catherine made a conscious effort to enrich John’s diet with some of the ‘Brain Foods’ I had incorporated in his diet plan. The positive result of it undoubtedly reflected in John’s better academic performance, and increased energy levels and brainpower.

It is well established that nutrition and learning go hand in hand. If you include the following food items which I like to call ‘Brain Foods’ in your child’s diet, it could result in a positive effect on their brain development and memory functioning.

1. Avocados

5 Brain Foods you must include in your child's diet

Monounsaturated fatty acids in this fruit help proper brain functioning. Have it in the form of a shake or as a dip mixed with vegetables.

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2. Blueberries

5 Brain Foods you must include in your child's diet

Diets rich in blueberries help improve learning capacity and motor skills. If your child does not like the taste, give it to them fresh with yoghurt, as frozen pops or as candies by freeze-drying.

3. Lentils and Beans

5 Brain Foods you must include in your child's diet

Folate in lentils and beans help to increase brainpower. You can give about 100gms of cooked beans a day to your child.

4. Oatmeal

5 Brain Foods you must include in your child's diet

Oatmeal is not just a healthy morning cereal; this also helps in improving memory power. Have it as a breakfast cereal with hot or cold milk.

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5. Nuts and Seeds

5 Brain Foods you must include in your child's diet

Nuts and seeds are tasty and at the same time they help in brain development. Add an ounce of walnuts, hazelnuts, almonds, cashews, peanuts, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds or flaxseeds to your child’s everyday diet.

Catherine made small changes in John’s consciously. Gradually he changed from a ‘king of junk foods’ to a ‘king of brain foods’. His grades started improving and he became more confident of himself and his abilities. Is your child a ’emperor of junk foods’ or an ’emperor of brain foods’?

 (This article first appeared in The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine)

Share this article with your friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

Junior Public Speaking & Confidence Building Workshop

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The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication. NEW POSTER 6 copy

Public Speaking Camp

public speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Junior Champs Leadership Camp

 Junior Champs Leadership Camp

Public Speaking for children

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp

 

About Ujjwala Baxi

Ujjwala Baxi is a Registered Dietitian, Certified Diabetes Educator and a Medical Nutrition Therapist with an experience of 10 years. She provides diet consultations, helping her clients to attain their health goal in the most practical and affordable ways to create lasting results. She is actively involved in creating health awareness through her various workshops for children as well as adults. She is a Health Promotion Board Ambassador and founder of Poshan - Cure thru Diet. In the past, she has worked as a Research Dietitian at B.Y.L Nair hospital and as Chief Dietitian at K.J. Somaiya hospital, Mumbai.

Public Speaking for Children: Top 9 Myths

Whether your child is in primary school or secondary school, whether in local school or international school, one thing is certain: they will be called upon to do presentations in front of others. In fact, effective public speaking for children is a topic being studied by many experts. Effective public speaking is a crucial skill that is often overlooked in the formative years of a child. However, there are many myths of public speaking that hinder the development of this skill in children.

Many parents are concerned that their children are losing out opportunities at school, in internships, university admission interviews, job interviews and many other important junctions in their lives because the kids are not able to convey the messages effectively. However, this is a skill that can influence the self-awareness of a child. So, parents are taking initiatives to impart this important skill to their children.

If you are interested in developing public speaking skill in your child, it is important for you to understand the myths around it. Knowing the right areas to focus on will help you in preparing your child to take on many challenges in their lives.

1. “That child is a good communicator because he/she talks a lot”.

Nothing can be farther from the truth. Talking a lot doesn’t mean effective communication.

Unlike popular belief, extroverts have no advantage over introverts when it comes to speaking. Like the way you learned to read and write, effective speaking means you acquire the skill set and practice it.

2. “My child is a horrible communicator. He/She doesn’t talk much”.

The first rule of public speaking is that ‘lot’ does not mean ‘effective’. In this knowledge economy, people do not have the time and patience to listen and understand. Our busy lives have significantly reduced our attention spans. As a whole, we listen less than we used to. So, if your child is able to speak effectively and concisely within a short time, he/she is a winner. The important words here are ‘effective’, ‘effective’ and ‘effective’.

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3. “Let them focus on academics now, communication come later”.

It is true that your child can pick up communication skills at any stage in his/her life. Communication is a life skill that requires regular practice. However, when you procrastinate it, your child is losing out on many opportunities in life. Your child is losing the window of opportunity to make it a second nature. Lack of ability to communicate effectively invariably affects the confidence of the child. Imagine the boost in confidence and the increase in opportunities your child would get when he/she could convey their ideas better and persuade and inspire others.

What is the right time for your child to learn public speaking? This is what an expert has to say about this. 

 

4. “Public speaking is all about Speaking”.

There are many school and social situations where your child would need to present and speak. The audience response to a speech depends on many things other than the ‘actual speaking’. This includes delivery, body language, eye contact, the speech craft, engagement with the audience, confident demeanor and managing the fear among others.

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5. “Public speaking is only for a few people who are gifted in it”.

Surveys show that public speaking is the No. 1 fear among a vast majority of people. The truth is, even the greatest orators became great only with practice. Give your child the opportunities to cultivate and practice the skill so that your child could also express his/her ideas to be successful in the field they choose to pursue.

6. “People will notice my child when he/she works hard”.

Competency is not to be underestimated and it can never be replaced. However, people do not have the time to go around and unearth talented people. Public speaking skills enable your child communicate the talents and ideas they have.

After 13 year old Evelyn (name changed for this article) got trained on public speaking skills, she changed from a timid, relatively unknown teenager to a confident student leader. Her teachers and peers started noticing her and hence she stumbled upon opportunities after opportunities. Her parents say her progress was something they could only dream about earlier. According to them, the boost in confidence she got  from her public speaking skills reflected in her academic skills as well. She got promoted from standard stream to express stream at school and got a scholarship.

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7. “Public Speaking = Show n Tell”.

Many kids learn and do ‘Show n tell’. At a very young age, show n tell helps kids to build up the confidence to stand up and say a few sentences about a ‘prop’ in front of a small audience. However, public speaking skills go much beyond gathering that initial confidence. Public speaking involves many strategies and frameworks that will help your child to speak express themselves well without the help of a ‘prop’.

8. “My child does not want to be a public speaker. She/He has other plans about the future”.

The truth is, we all speak in public. Public speaking is much more standing in front of 200 people. Public speaking happens when you go to that shop and tries to struck up a conversation with the salesman. It happens when you speak to the officer at the airline terminal hoping for an upgrade. It happens when you speak about your ideas for the group project, a family vacation or when you go for an intern interview. Isn’t it useful if you know how to effectively handle these situations?

9. “My child is a great public speaker because he/she has already attended a public speaking class”.

Public speaking is a life skill. Like in the case of other life skills, the best way to master it is to practice. If your child has attended a public speaking class where they have picked up strategies and frameworks and they know how to use that, it is great. Find opportunities for them to practice the skills. It could be a family function, an opportunity at their school or a community event. Does your child’s coach provide ongoing practice opportunities that will enable your child to practice the skills until it become their second nature?

Would you like to improve your child’s public speaking skills? Read some tips on public speaking here. You can find more tips from experts here.

Share this article with your friends and colleagues, so that they too are aware of this amidst their busy schedules. 

Do you have any insights or tips that you use? Would you like to share that? Please use the comments section below and let us know!

Junior Public Speaking & Confidence Building Workshop

Public Speaking for children Singapore

The Kidz Parade Magazine 

Are you looking for a special present for an adorable child? Why don’t you give a present that will leave a lifetime positive impact? When you give The Kidz Parade Edutainment Magazine as a present, you are opening the door to a world of Creativity and Communication. NEW POSTER 6 copy

Public Speaking Camp

public speaking for children Singapore

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Junior Champs Leadership Camp

 Junior Champs Leadership Camp

Public Speaking for children

You might also be interested in Testimonials Confidence Hub Public Speaking Camp

About Sindu Sreebhavan

Sindu Sreebhavan is the founder of As Many Minds Minds Pte Ltd and the chief editor of The Kidz Parade Edutainment magazine, Asia's premium publication for cultivating creativity and creative writing in children. Sindu is also the founder of International Youth Leadership and Innovation Forum (IYLIF). With a passion to infuse innovation in education and inject innovative mindset in people, Sindu writes, speaks and consults on innovation and creativity in business and education. She says innovation does not start with invention, it starts with a mindset. “The best gift you can give a child is the power of Confidence, Creativity and Communication” is her tagline. She is passionate about educating educators, parents and children about youth development, youth leadership, education innovation and 21st century education. She supports children, parents, schools and several organisations in these areas.